2016 Conference Details

May 17, 2016 Comments Off on 2016 Conference Details

Hotel:

Homewood Suites by Hilton Huntsville-Downtown

714 Gallatin Street SW

Huntsville, AL 35801

There are 20 rooms blocked off for the conference at the price of $109 plus tax but this includes breakfast on Saturday morning. We have a conference room reserved in the hotel and it has PowerPoint and a screen.

Hotel Website:

http://homewoodsuites3.hilton.com/en/hotels/alabama/homewood-suites-by-hilton-huntsville-downtown-al-HSVGSHW/index.html

Local Craft Beer Hour @ 5:15 p.m. on June 10th

After the keynote address there will be a cocktail hour served by Old Town Beer Exchange with local craft beers from around Huntsville. Huntsville has the largest number of craft breweries per capita in the entire South. We will have the owner of OTBX give a short class on Huntsville craft beer and then give a tasting for the “class.”

Old Town Beer Exchange:

http://otbxhsv.com/

Here is a list of restaurants in downtown Huntsville:

http://www.downtownhuntsville.org/dining-2/

Friday, June 10, 2016

10am – 12pm

Panel 1: Southern Capitalism and Anti-Unionism

Matthew Hild, Comment

Chad Pearson, “Re-thinking Employer Violence and Economic Growth in the Progressive Era South”

Michael Pierce, “Free Enterprise and the Fight to Maintain Jim Crow in 1940s Arkansas”

Taco Mama will serve lunch on Friday, June 10, 2016, and it will be a taco bar with fresh fixings served at the hotel conference room. There will be beef, chicken, and veggie choices, chips and salsa, and drinks.

Lunch Website:

http://www.tacomamaonline.com/index.html

1:30pm – 3:30pm

Panel 2: New Approaches to Southern Capitalism

Keri Leigh Merritt, “Slavery, Capitalism, and Labor Power in the Deep South”

Enrico Beltramini, “If Southern Capitalism Exists, Which Type of Capitalism Is It?”

Scott Huffard, “Railroads and the Magic of Capitalism in Alabama”

4pm

Keynote address by Kari Frederickson

6pm Dinner on your own

Saturday, June 11, 2016 

Breakfast for guests of the hotel is included in your rate. For non hotel guests there are a number of place to eat and a Starbucks just down the street. 

8:30am – 10:30am

Panel 3: Capitalism in the Early Republic South

Robert Scott Davis, “At the Beginning and End of his Rope: Counterfeiting, Capitalism, and the Career of Thomas Davis, 1782-1822”

Patrick Luck, “‘You Shall Find Profit’: Capitalism in the Early Republic Lower Mississippi Valley”

Jonathan Wells

10:45am-12:15pm

Panel 4: War, Industry, and Capitalism in the South

Matthew Downs, “World War I and the Impetus for Industrial Development in Mobile, Alabama”

Tyler Gray Greene, “‘Now It’s a Pasture, Now It’s a Plant’: Highways, Trucking, and the Reshaping of Rural Capitalism in Post-World War II North Carolina”

Boxed lunches will be provided for those who want to eat and run or stay and talk.

 

2016 Conference Speaker Announced!

January 4, 2016 Comments Off on 2016 Conference Speaker Announced!

Announcing that Kari Frederickson, associate professor of history at the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa and author of Cold War Dixie  and The Dixiecrat Revolt and the End of the Solid South, 1932-1968 will be the featured speaker at the OSSECS/SIP conference in June.

The CFP is still open!

2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

Date: June 10–11, 2016

Proposal Deadline: January 15, 2016

Location: University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL

The Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture and Society (formerly Southern Industrialization Project) invites scholars in all stages of their careers to join us at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL, for a conference entitled, “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?” Historians and many others have long debated whether capitalism existed in the colonial and antebellum South and to what extent and when capitalism developed in the postbellum and New Souths that followed. Certainly, southerners have traditionally sought “profit” but did that mark them as capitalists? What is “capitalism” in the southern context? Were antebellum planters and their related business counterparts capitalist? What about small businessmen and yeomen farmers? After the Civil War, to what extent were textile and other industrial entrepreneurs capitalist? What impact did twentieth century events such as the Great Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement have on the South’s economy and its alleged evolution towards modern, industrial capitalism? How important is the comparison to northern capitalists? Our two-day conference will explore the current state of scholarship on the capitalism question, including, of course, whether further debate is worth the effort.

Please send a short description of your paper (approx. 350 words) and a c.v. to Katherine Jewell at kjewell1@fitchburgstate.edu. Panel proposals are also welcome.

Deadline Extended: 2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

December 3, 2015 Comments Off on Deadline Extended: 2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

Date: June 10–11, 2016

Proposal Deadline: December 1, 2015 January 15, 2016

Location: University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL

The Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture and Society (formerly Southern Industrialization Project) invites scholars in all stages of their careers to join us at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL, for a conference entitled, “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?” Historians and many others have long debated whether capitalism existed in the colonial and antebellum South and to what extent and when capitalism developed in the postbellum and New Souths that followed. Certainly, southerners have traditionally sought “profit” but did that mark them as capitalists? What is “capitalism” in the southern context? Were antebellum planters and their related business counterparts capitalist? What about small businessmen and yeomen farmers? After the Civil War, to what extent were textile and other industrial entrepreneurs capitalist? What impact did twentieth century events such as the Great Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement have on the South’s economy and its alleged evolution towards modern, industrial capitalism? How important is the comparison to northern capitalists? Our two-day conference will explore the current state of scholarship on the capitalism question, including, of course, whether further debate is worth the effort.

Please send a short description of your paper (approx. 350 words) and a c.v. to Katherine Jewell at kjewell1@fitchburgstate.edu. Panel proposals are also welcome.

CFP: 2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

August 21, 2015 Comments Off on CFP: 2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

2016 OSSECS Conference: “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?”

Date: June 10–11, 2016

Location: University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL

The Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture and Society (formerly Southern Industrialization Project) invites scholars in all stages of their careers to join us at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville AL, for a conference entitled, “Southern Capitalism, Myth or Magic?” Historians and many others have long debated whether capitalism existed in the colonial and antebellum South and to what extent and when capitalism developed in the postbellum and New Souths that followed. Certainly, southerners have traditionally sought “profit” but did that mark them as capitalists? What is “capitalism” in the southern context? Were antebellum planters and their related business counterparts capitalist? What about small businessmen and yeomen farmers? After the Civil War, to what extent were textile and other industrial entrepreneurs capitalist? What impact did twentieth century events such as the Great Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement have on the South’s economy and its alleged evolution towards modern, industrial capitalism? How important is the comparison to northern capitalists? Our two-day conference will explore the current state of scholarship on the capitalism question, including, of course, whether further debate is worth the effort.

Please send a short description of your paper (approx. 350 words) and a c.v. to Katherine Jewell at kjewell1@fitchburgstate.edu by December 1, 2015. Panel proposals are also welcome.

Find us at SHA 2014 Atlanta!

September 13, 2014 Comments Off on Find us at SHA 2014 Atlanta!

luncheon flyer2014.11.15OSSECS will have two exciting events at SHA 2014. As announced on the SHA program:
Friday, November 14: 11:45 A.M.-1:30 P.M.

16. REASSESSING THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE U.S. SOUTH IN THE WORLD WAR ONE ERA: A ROUNDTABLE
Sponsored by the Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture, and Society
PRESIDING: David Carlton, Vanderbilt University
“Work or Fight”: Middle-Class Perceptions of Labor in North Carolina’s Great War Pamela C. Edwards, Shepherd University
The Southern Textile Industry at War, 1914-1818 Annette Cox, Morrisville, NC
Race, Property, and Crime in Rural Georgia before the New Deal Mark Ellis, University of Strathclyde, Scotland
The Business Meeting of the OSSECS will immediately follow the roundtable in the same room. All attendees are encouraged to stay on. Snacks on the spot are allowed between the end of the session and the beginning of the meeting.

Saturday, November 15: 11:45 A.M.-1:30 P.M.

41. JOINT LUNCHEON: ORGANIZATION FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN ECONOMY, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY – SOUTHERN LABOR STUDIES ASSOCIATION
PRESIDING: Catherine Clinton, University of Texas, San Antonio
Within the Grigsby Household: The Political and Moral Economy of Domestic Service in Late Antebellum Kentucky
Susanna Delfino, University of Genoa, Italy

Tickets must be purchased directly from the Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture, and Society by November 7, 2014. For more information, consult http://www.ossecs.org or e-mail Louis.Kyriakoudes@usm.edu. Download a PDF of the luncheon flyer2014.11.15.

See the entire SHA program here.

Call for Papers – SHA Atlanta 2014

April 8, 2014 Comments Off on Call for Papers – SHA Atlanta 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture, and Society (OSSECS) is organizing its annual workshop, to be held in conjunction with the meeting of the Southern Historical Association (Atlanta, November 13-16, 2014), on the following subject:

“Reassessing the political economy of the U.S. South in the World War One era”
Understandings of the southern economic and related socio-cultural realities during the 1910s and 1920s have much varied over the past few decades, increasingly challenging and even confuting in many ways the assumptions of the long-standing, referential interpretation set forth by C. Vann Woodward in the 1950s as for the nature and characters of the New South’s economy.

Paper proposals eligible for consideration should address any chosen aspect, either domestic or international, of the southern political economy (agriculture, manufacturing, industrial labor—either white and black—international commerce, and more), in the World War One era in light of the present, global approach to the study of southern history.

One-page proposals and a short CV should be sent to the Chairman of the of the Program Committee, Gavin Wright (write@stanford.edu), by April 30, 2014.

The Program Committee

Chairman:

Gavin Wright, Stanford University

Members:

David Carlton, Vanderbilt University

Susanna Delfino, University of Genoa, Italy

 

Minutes – 2012

January 12, 2013 Comments Off on Minutes – 2012

The minutes from the recent business meeting at the 2012 SHA Annual Meeting have been posted.